Copyright Law Philadelphia, PA

 

The United States affords protection through laws made accessible to authors who produce original published and unpublished works including the following: musical, literary, dramatic, artistic dance, audio materials, motion pictures. Websites and software are also included, as well as
architectural drawings and technical projects. A complete list is readily
available through the copyright office at http://www.copyright.gov.

If someone wants to use or reproduce an author's material or a portion
thereof, the author's permission must be sought. It is important for an
author to copyright his work to prevent theft. An idea per se cannot be
copyrighted, but a concrete concept developed around an idea may be. To be copyrighted the material must be in tangible form. Speeches that have not been recorded or performances not recorded are among material that cannot be copyrighted, as well as variations of common designs, slogans, ideas, concepts, discoveries, among others.

If a worker produces a work during his employment, or if the work was
ordered to be produced, the employer has the right to the copyright.
Examples are: compilation of material, a translation, a text explaining how a product works.

The Federal Government protects copyrighted material. A copyright form may be obtained online. However, if there are questions about your ability to obtain a copyright, or the property to be copyrighted is complex, it is best to seek the services of a copyright attorney.

Your copyright becomes part of the records of the Copyright Office. There is a fee for registering your copyright and a fee for searching the records. The Copyright Office is in the Library of Congress.

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